Race, tea and colonial resettlement : imperial families, interrupted

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Author: McCabe, Jane
Language: English
Summary: "A 20th-century saga of interracial Anglo-Indian tea dynasties prised apart and scattered as far away as New Zealand"--Provided by publisher.
"In the early 20th century, the 'problem' of interracial relations between British colonials and natives was a hotly debated topic in British India. One Scottish missionary's solution was to isolate and raise the mixed-race children of British tea planters and local women in an institution in Kalimpong, in the foothills of the Himalayas, before permanently resettling them--far from their maternal homeland--as workers in New Zealand. Historian Jane McCabe leads us through a compelling research journey that began with uncovering the story of her own grandmother, Lorna Peters, one of 130 adolescents resettled in New Zealand under the scheme between 1908 and 1938. Using records from the 'Homes' in Kalimpong and in-depth interviews with other descendants in New Zealand, she crafts a compelling, evocative, and unsentimental yet moving narrative--one that not only brings an untold part of imperial history to light, but also transforms previously broken and hushed family histories into an extraordinary collective story. This book attends to both the affective dimension of these traumatic familial disruptions, and to the larger economic and political drivers that saw government and missionary schemes breaking up Anglo-Indian families--schemes that relied on future forgetting"--Provided by publisher.
Physical Description: xvii, 253 pages
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN: 9781474299503 (hardback)
Published: London ; Bloomsbury Academic, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2017.

Call number

IISG 1984/946